Bitey Balls

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Project Information

In Bitey Balls, you play as a pet and you have to dominate the room that you share with another player. Jump around and gather as much candy as you can, while not breaking every object in the level.

  • Role: Game Designer
  • Project Type: Global Game Jam Game
  • Team size: 5 developers
  • Duties: Game Design, Level Design, Fine-tuning, Testing
  • Software used: Unity, Adobe Photoshop
  • Project duration: 48 hours
  • Playable link: Play Bitey Balls here!

My work

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Details about my work

We started the game jam by sitting together and brainstorming about the theme for this years GGJ, which was “What home means to you“. Thinking about topics what might be interesting to dive further into. Games that the whole team likes are local multiplayer games. Besides our love for the genre, they can be fairly simple, but with great entertainment value. Silliness is also something that we all enjoy and appreciate in games. During the brainstorming, we came up with animals, pets, in particular, that means home for us. We were talking about mechanics and how the game should function.

While the project and repository were being set up, I went on with drawing and designing on how I saw the game. I did this by doing research on similar games and how they function, drawing my ideas out on the board and checking with the team if they agree with the kind of direction that I am taking the project. When I had something that was looking promising, I started making an MDA model, while another designer had set up a document to write down the high-level concept.

When the concept was somewhat done, I started making a block-out of the level, so that I could start in the Engine (Unity). I made a block-out of the level that I had designed and placed it in Unity to work on the camera. The camera position, rotation, and field of view are really important in games with just one room. It should be clear to the players where their characters are at all time. I choose to go for a more top-down view, rather than a more view that is more from the side. With a viewpoint between bird-eye and side view, you can use more height of the level, since you as the player can see more of the side of your character and the room. But the view that is more from the top worked better because it was easy to lose your character behind objects.

While assets and the mechanics are being developed, I started implementing them in Unity and the level that I had created. I gave all the assets the correct components, gave values to them and made prefabs out of them. This process was for a big part trial and error since I had to give values and test them to see how they work out.